Julio's Blog


Updating the Ghost blog platform in couple simple steps

Hello All, This blog is running on Ghost. Here is a simple way to update the Ghost blogging platform to the latest version. Stop the service running Ghost, in my case, I am using supervisord to do so: supervisorctl stop ghost Create a backup of your blog content: tar cvzf www.myghostblog.com.tar.gz www.myghostblog.com.com/ Download and unzip the latest Ghost version: mkdir -p /tmp/latest-ghost; cd /tmp/latest-ghost curl -L -O https://ghost.org/zip/ghost-latest.zip unzip ghost-latest.zip Move the content directory on your blog. cd /var/www/vhost/www.myghostblog.com/ mv content content2 Copy all the content... read more »


What is new in Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10

First things first, I do work for Red Hat! Now with that out of the way let’s jump into today’s blog topic: What is new in Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10! Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 was released yesterday (press release here, this new version is based on the OpenStack “Newton” release and also includes fixes to know issues of the Red Hat OpenStack Platform. The installer (Red Hat OpenStack Platform director) includes the next new features: Custom and composable roles: Templates have been decomposed into a set of multiple smaller discrete templates, each representing a composable service. Everything can be split except Pacemaker-managed... read more »


A quick introduction to OpenStack Heat.

An important component of a cloud environment is orchestration. In OpenStack, there is a program dedicated exclusively to Orchestration within the platform and the main project in this program is Heat. In this blog post, we will learn a little bit about OpenStack Heat (Heat from here on) and how to create simple orchestrations with it. According to the OpenStack Foundation, Heat (https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Heat) is an orchestration engine to launch multiple composite cloud applications based on templates in the form of text files that can be treated as code. In simple terms, Heat provides the OpenStack users with a way to automate... read more »


High Availability and Pacemaker 101!

In this blog post, we will talk a little bit about High Availability and a little bit more about Pacemaker. Here are some of the topics of this post: Introduction to High Availability (HA) and Clustering. Benefits of Highly Available applications. How HA is implemented on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7. HA requirements on RHEL 7. Demo: Building a 3 node Apache cluster. Introduction to High Availability (HA) and Clustering. What is High Availability (HA)? In IT, High Availability refers to a system or component that is continuously operational for a desirably long length of time. 3 cores principles to HA Elimination of single point... read more »


Selecting the right storage backend for your OpenStack cloud.

Embracing OpenStack or any other Infrastructure-As-A-Service (IaaS) platform should not be the only decision to take on the road to building your private cloud. Selecting the right cloud components like server hardware, network (architecture and topology), and storage backend is crucial to creating an OpenStack cloud architecture that will meet your needs. In this article, I will discuss what are the considerations to take when choosing the storage backend for your OpenStack cloud. What could go wrong First, let's discuss what could be the pitfalls of selecting the wrong storage backend for your OpenStack cluster: Performance problems: You will most likely have performance issues if your... read more »